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Orchard Primary Academy

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

At Orchard, we provide all children with the opportunities, experiences, nurture and belief that will enrich their education and embed an ethos of inclusion and achievement for all.

Ensuring that our children achieve their potential, irrespective of their special educational needs or disabilities (SEND), is at the heart of our inclusive practice. Every child contributes to our school community and their wellbeing development, achievement and happiness is central to this.

We believe that every teacher is a teacher of every child or young person, including those with SEND. If children are not able to ‘learn the way we teach’ then we must ‘teach the way they learn’. We believe that good practice for pupils with special educational needs is good practice for all.

Please click to access the Kirklees local offer.

What are additional needs?

At Orchard Primary Academy, we provide all children with the opportunities, experiences, nurture and belief that will enrich their education and embed an ethos of inclusion and achievement for all. Ensuring that our children achieve their potential, irrespective of their additional or special educational needs (SEND) is at the heart of our inclusive practice. Every child contributes to our school community and their wellbeing, development, achievement and happiness is central to this.  Any child may have additional needs at some point during their time in school. ‘Additional Needs’ are the main term used within the school for needs presented by students that cannot be met by quality first teaching.

Appendix 1 sets out a definition and the most likely areas.

We have a whole-school approach to Additional Needs (“AN”) policy and practice. Pupils identified as having an additional need are, as far as is practicable, fully integrated into mainstream classes. Every effort is made to ensure that they have full access to the National Curriculum and are integrated into all aspects of the school, including the extended curriculum (such as school trips and breakfast and after-school clubs). The SEN Code of Practice makes it clear that all teachers are teachers of pupils with special educational needs and that quality teaching in the mainstream classroom alongside their peers is the first stage in provision for all children with special educational needs.

In addition, all teachers are responsible for identifying pupils with AN and, in collaboration with the pupils and their parents as well as the Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENDCo) we ensure that those pupils requiring different or additional support are identified at an early stage.

What should I do if I think my child may have an additional need?

If you are concerned that your child may have an additional need your child’s class teacher will probably be the best first point of contact. Please make an arrangement to talk to them about your concern.  You could also approach the SENDCO who has responsibility for all children with AN in the school.  The SENDCO hosts regular drop-in sessions each week during term time for any parent who wishes to discuss their child’s needs.

Please see Appendix 2 for times of these drop sessions.

How are children with additional needs identified?

Early identification of pupils with AN is a priority. On entry to the school or nursery a member of the senior leadership team will meet with you and your child and discuss their needs. If it is felt necessary the SENDCO might contact you to discuss your child’s specific needs.  On entry your child will be assessed, and as the children continue through school, the school will use appropriate screening and assessment tools to ascertain pupil progress. Assessment data may include: 

  • Information given from parents.
  • Evidence obtained by teacher observation and/or assessment.
  • Children's performance in National Curriculum subjects
  • Progress in relation to Assessing Pupils’ Progress objectives.
  • Standardised screening or assessment tools.
  • Records from pre-school settings.
  • Reports from external agencies, such as Educational Psychology, Portage and Speech Therapy.

Please see Appendix 3 for our stepped approach for identifying Special Educational needs.

What support is available for children with additional needs?

The main methods of provision made by the school are:

  • Full-time education in classes, with additional help and support by class teacher through a differentiated curriculum
  • In-class support with adult assistance
  • Periods of withdrawal individually or in groups to work with a support teacher/ETA
  • Support from specialists within class or as part of a withdrawal programme
  • Additional resources to support individual children based on a specific need.

An example of the range of interventions available is in Appendix 4.

How will the progress of children with additional needs be monitored?

The progress of children at every stage of the above graduated approach will be tracked using O Track, using this assessment data progress will be discussed at termly pupil progress meetings.  Progress for children with an ANP will be discussed with parents at termly teacher consultations. Following this an invite for an optional meeting with the SENDCO will be given should parents so wish. In addition, children with a My Support Plan or EHCP will have additional review meetings each term with the SENDCO. Furthermore, children with a My Support Plan or EHCP will have detailed yearly review meetings to which all those involved in supporting the child will be invited.

An example of our ANPs is available in Appendix 5.

What support is available for children’s overall well being?

The school utilises many strategies to support the development of pupils’ social skills and enhance self-esteem, including play leaders, breakfast and after-school clubs as well as our Dojo system where children can achieve points for being helpful. We have two full-time learning mentors who lead self-esteem and nurture groups as well as providing one-to-one counselling and mentoring where necessary. We also have access to a range of services who may be contacted to offer additional support and guidance as necessary. 

What specialist services and expertise are available?

The SENDCO has over 15 years’ experience of working with children with additional needs, holds the Certificate in SEN Management and Co-ordination as well as a post graduate Certificate in Autism. In addition, the SENDCO and other SENDCOs in the South Pennine Academies Trust meet termly to disseminate good practice and share expertise. Furthermore, the school has qualified specialist additional needs staff, both teachers and ETAs, in several different areas. An ongoing programme of training is in place to ensure that teachers and support staff have appropriate skills and knowledge in areas that will improve their teaching and support of children with additional needs.

The school also recognises the essential contribution that external support services make in assisting to identify, assess, and provide for, AN pupils.

A list of the support services which the school may draw upon when required and the links it has with other organisations, together with a list of support services for parents, is provided in Appendix 6.

How accessible are we?

We are determined to ensure that the school is accessible to all both in terms of our curriculum and our facilities and that every pupil is enabled to take part in all that the school has to offer, wherever possible providing additional support or making necessary adjustments. Our early years and Key stage 1 sections of school are fully accessible.

For some pupils, additional arrangements and adjustments will be made to enable them to fully access standardised tests. This might include additional time, rest breaks or the use of a scribe or word processor.

The school has clear signage and all information is visually supported where possible. Every effort is made to ensure that there are no physical barriers to participation for any pupil.

 

How do we prepare for transition?

Children and young people with AN can become particularly anxious about “moving on” so we seek to support successful transition by:

When moving forms in school: All children will participate in Transition Days to meet their new teacher and get to know the classroom. We will share all information about special arrangements and support that has been made to help your child achieve their learning goals with their new teacher. Where a child has an EHCP or particular need a transition booklet is completed with the child to help them to get to know their new classroom environment.

Please see Appendix 7 for an example of this.

 

When moving to another school: We will contact the new school Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator and share information about special arrangements and support that has been made to help your child achieve their learning goals.

We will ensure that all records are passed on as soon as possible.

 

In year 6 - 7 transition:

All pupils will attend Transition Days at the new school. Prior to any Transition Days at the new school, the Assistant Head (Inclusion) will contact the Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator at the new school and share information about special arrangements and support that has been made to help your child achieve their learning goals. In the case of children with an EHCP, the new school Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator will be invited to attend the year 6 annual review.

We will ensure that all records are passed on as soon as possible.

 We may also arrange:

  • visits from staff from the new school to our school prior to transition to meet and/or observe the pupil in class; and/or
  • additional transition visits to the new school; and/or
  • additional multi-agency meetings to create a more detailed “transition plan” which may include ‘My New School’ books (with photographs, maps etc.), a staggered entry into the new school, home visits by the new school staff and any necessary adaptations or equipment requirements.

 

What activities outside of the academic curriculum are available for children with AN?

 

Children with AN are welcome to attend all of the following activities provided by the school:

  • Breakfast Club: 8.00 – 8.50am Mon to Fri – which is free of charge.
  • After-School Clubs – we offer a variety of clubs every night after school (except Friday). Clubs after school usually run from 3.15-4.pm. Examples include homework, art club, sports clubs, dance, cooking, nature nutters. All clubs are free. 

Special arrangements can often be made for extra adults to support children with AN, where necessary. 

What do the abbreviations mean?

AN: Additional Needs: The main term used within the school for needs presented by students that cannot be met by quality first teaching.

SEND: Special Educational Needs and Disabilities: A sub-section of Additional Needs referring primarily to the needs presented by students who have educational needs and are on the school’s SEN Support Register. Often abbreviated as SEND or ‘Special Needs’.

SpLD: Specific Learning Difficulties: An umbrella term covering a wide range of identifiable difficulties, usually inherent, that an individual may present with. When these difficulties are clustered together, often more definitive sub-sets are used such as ‘dyslexia’, ‘dyscalculia’, ‘ADHD’ etc.

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A specific learning difficulty typically presenting as exceptionally low concentration span, poor working memory, limited organisational skills with extreme impulsivity.

ADD: Attention Deficit Disorder: A specific learning difficulty typically presenting as exceptionally low concentration span, poor working memory, daydreaming / procrastination and slower thinking through of concepts, questions etc.

AD: Attachment Disorder: A range of difficulties typically affecting mood, adherence to social norms and social relationships arising from a failure to form normal attachments to primary caregivers during early childhood (0-3 years). Also has causative link to incidences of abuse, neglect, sudden separation from / changes in caregivers during early childhood.

ASC: Autistic Spectrum Condition: A psychological condition presenting itself in a variety of forms (Autism, Asperger Syndrome,, typically including specific learning difficulties centred around limited empathy, fixated / literal thinking, limited ability to interpret language, limited ability to engage in a variety of social situations / experiences etc.

Dyslexia or  Dyslexic Tendencies: A specific learning difficulty typically presenting itself in one or more of the main areas of literacy – namely reading and spelling. Students will have difficulties with working memory and often organisational skills. A commonly used indicator is where there is a clear discrepancy between literacy skills and intelligence / general ability – though students of all ability levels may have dyslexia.

Dyspraxia or DCD: A specific learning difficulty based around the brain’s transmission of signals that control gross and fine motor skills – typically affecting planning of movements and co-ordination. Can also impact on language development.

Dyscalculia: A specific learning difficulty typically presenting itself in one or more of the main areas of Math / numeracy – namely use of symbols, acquiring arithmetical skills particularly those requiring use of working memory, and spatial understanding. On the surface, these often relate to basic concepts such as: telling the time, calculating prices and handling change, and measuring and estimating things such as temperature and speed.

HI: Hearing Impairment: Difficulties based around fully or partially reduced functioning in one or both ear’s ability to detect and/or process sounds. Caused by a wide range of biological and environmental factors, loss of hearing typically arises in young people from a genetic / biological condition or injury to part/s of the ear.

MLD: Moderate Learning Difficulties: Definitions of Moderate Learning Difficulties vary. However, a common understanding is that there must be substantial difficulties (2+ years below standard progress) in two or more of the following areas: literacy, numeracy, speech and language, social skills, memory, concentration – typically in conjunction with an exceptionally low score on an individual test of intelligence and notable low self-esteem / independence in learning.

PI: Physical Impairment: Difficulties based around a full or partially reduced muscular-skeletal functioning in part/s of the body. Caused by a wide range of biological and environmental factors, this type of difficulty typically arises in young people from a genetic / biological condition, a medical condition or a significant injury.

SLCN: Speech, Language and Communication Needs: A range of specific learning difficulties related to all aspects of communication in children and young people. These can include difficulties with fluency, forming sounds and words, formulating sentences, understanding what others say, and using language for socially and learning.

VI: Visual Impairment: Difficulties based around fully or partially reduced functioning in one or both eye’s ability to detect and/or process images. Caused by a wide range of biological and environmental factors, loss of vision typically arises in young people from a genetic / biological condition or injury to part/s of the eye.

The following two areas are not classed as a learning difficulty, condition or disability but are a formally identifiable area of need.

 

Access Arrangements: Additional support for students sitting exams / controlled assessments.

Additional Needs Plan (ANP) or Individual Behaviour Plan (IBP): A document to plan and record actions being undertaken to meet the additional needs of a student.

Annual Review: A legally-binding yearly review of needs and support arrangements for a student with an Education, Health and Care Plan. Involves written reports and a meeting between all relevant parties.

Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP): This was formerly known as a Statement of Special Educational Needs. A legally-binding document outlining funding and provision to be implemented by the school and other agencies in support of a young person.

Health Care Plan or Medical Needs Plan: A document holding information on a student’s medical needs with advice on responses where necessary.

In-class Support: Strategies and additional staffing put in place to ensure the inclusion and achievement of a student or group of students in the mainstream classroom.

Intervention: Small group or individual programmes of study for students with identified additional needs.

Personal Educational Plan (PEP): A document to plan and record actions being undertaken to ensure the well-being and progress of students registered as ‘Child in Care’ / ‘Looked-after Child’.

Request for an Education, Health and Care Plan: Triggers assessment of a student’s needs undertaken by the school, educational psychologist, Local Authority, health and social care services to determine whether an Education, Health and Care Plan is required.

SEND Register: A document holding information on all students identified as having additional needs requiring specific intervention in school.

 How have we consulted with parents on this offer?

As part of the review of this Offer, parents of children with EHCPs and those receiving specialist support were consulted and their comments and suggestions incorporated into the Offer.  We are committed to making this Offer as comprehensive and inclusive as possible.  Accordingly, we would invite all parents to help us improve the quality and clarity of our offer by sending any suggestions, comments or questions to the SENDCO at vfarrell@orchardprimaryacademy.org 

Where can I find the local offer?

 What is the Kirklees Local Offer?

The Local Offer has been developed as part of the new Children and Families Act. It aims to provide information on education, health and social care provision available for disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs, in a way that can be accessed quickly and easily.

Who is producing the Local Offer?

Kirklees Council is working with parents, carers, young people, schools, colleges, early years providers and health services to produce the Local Offer.

What information do schools provide?

Schools have a duty to provide information about special educational needs that is accessible to pupils, parents and carers. We need to make sure this information is kept up to date.

The Kirklees Local Offer can be found at www.kirklees.gov.uk/localoffer

Appendix 1 Appendix 2Appendix 3 

Appendix 4Appendix 5Appendix 6

Appendix 7 

More information about our SEND provision and procedures can be found by clicking on the links below:

SEND Policy 

Please see how we aim to meet the accessibility needs of children with disabilities by clicking on the Accessibility Policy below:

Accessibility Policy

Contact Details

SENDCO - Ms Vanessa Farrell

Phone Number: 01924 469578

Email: office@orchardprimaryacademy.org

Support for Parents and Carers

This is a list of information websites, tips and resources to help you support your children with their additional needs, learning and self-esteem. Children have varying needs and there is no one size approach fits all. It is quite common for children to have additional needs that span all these areas, so select the resources that meet the needs of your child, without worrying too much about the label or category they fall under. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses and these SEND strategies will be beneficial to many children, whether or not they have a diagnosis.

Autism Spectrum Conditions 

Websites for further information

https://www.autism.org.uk/ 

Tips

Children with Autism need structure and routine. You can help

them by using visual timetables to help them see what is happening at each step of the day, so they know in advance what they will be doing next. This will relieve some of their anxiety.

- You might want to set a specific place for them to do any work or tasks. At school they may have this in the form of a workstation to support their learning (see example in resources section). Each

child’s workstation may differ slightly, so you could ask your child

to help you set one up that will suit them or that they are already used to.

- Prepare them for changes in routine.

- Help your children to recognise and name different emotions and feelings. You can do this by discussing their own emotions, how characters in books and on TV programmes might be feeling and

how you yourselves might be feeling. Alongside naming the

emotion, describe it and explain why you, they or fictional

characters might be feeling like that. You can also play role play guessing games and ask them to name the emotion and say why.

 - Use a 5 point scale to support children in managing their emotions.

- Use social stories and comic strip cartoons to help children understand different situations and perspectives and address inappropriate behaviour.

- Have a visual aid to support wanted and unwanted behaviours

- Be aware of your child’s sensory needs and support them in managing that need to help them learn e.g. sound reducing earphones if noise is a problem, comfortable clothes, keep the area surrounding the work space clear to avoid over-stimulation etc.

- Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.

Links to Resources:

Social Stories:

https://www.autism.org.uk/advice-and-guidance/topics/communication/communication-tools/social-stories-and-comic-strip-coversations 

5 Point Scale:

https://www.5pointscale.com/ 

Social Skills:

https://www.twinkl.co.uk/resources/social-emotional-and-mental-health-difficulties-areas-of-need-primary-send-inclusion/social-social-emotional-and-mental-health-areas-of-need-primary-send-inclusion-teaching-resources/social-skills-social-social-emotional-and-mental-health-areas-of-need-primary-send-inclusion-teaching-resources


Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

Websites for further information

General Info on ADHD - http://www.adders.org/info170.htm

Tips

Offer routines and structure

- Create a quiet space for them to learn with no distractions.

- Give them something to fiddle with whilst you are talking to them or you want them to focus. It can also be helpful to let them move around whilst they listen.

- Ask them to do one task at a time

- Provide checklists or visual timetables to support organisation.

- Use timers to help with time management and build in frequent movement breaks.

- Suggest rather than criticise (children with ADHD often have low self-esteem)

- Provide lots of opportunities for exercise and movement.

- Set up a reward scheme to encourage them and support them with their behaviour.

- Build on success and help children to pursue more of what they enjoy.

- Put clear boundaries in place.

Links to Resources:

https://www.adhdcare.co.uk/?p=online.resources


Dyslexia

Websites for further information

https://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/advice/children/how-can-i-support-my-child

Tips

It is important to encourage children to recognise and pursue the areas in which they excel (do more of what they enjoy) and support them with the areas they find difficult.

-Allow children to use a word processer to complete some written tasks. This highlights spelling errors and offers alternatives. If they can’t type, encourage them to learn, so that they are able to use a Word Processer with more speed and fluency.

-Play games to support memory and retention e.g. pairs, Go Fish etc. (see resource links for more ideas)

Links to Resources:

Dancemat Typing – free beginners typing course for children. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf2f9j6/articles/z3c6tfr

Free Phonics games - https://www.phonicsplay.co.uk/

https://www.weareteachers.com/working-memory/

https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/learning-at-home/homework-study-skills/8-working-memory-boosters

Free audio stories https://stories.audible.com/start-listen


Dyspraxia/ Motor difficulties

Websites for further information

https://dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/

http://www.movementmattersuk.org/

Tips

- Allow children to use a word processor to complete some written tasks. If they can’t type, encourage them to learn, so that they are able to use a Word Processor with more speed and fluency.

- Offer routines and structure

- Create a quiet space for them to learn with no distractions.

- Give them something to fiddle with whilst you are talking to them or you want them to focus. It can also be helpful to let them move around whilst they listen.

- Ask them to do one task at a time

- Provide checklists or visual timetables to support organisation.

- Use timers to help with time management and build in frequent movement breaks.

- Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.

- Help your children develop their fine and gross motor skills and core stability 

Resources

Dancemat Typing – free beginners typing course for children. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf2f9j6/articles/z3c6tfr

Motor skills development: https://www.lincolnshirecommunityhealthservices.nhs.uk/our-services/childrens-services/childrens-therapy-services/first-move


Dyscalculia

Websites for further information

https://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/dyslexia/neurodiversity-and-co-occurring-differences/dyscalculia-and-maths-difficulties

Tips

-        Concentrate on one problem at a time.

-        - Use lots of visuals and physical resources that the children can move around.

- Include children in supporting you with everyday maths problems e.g. cooking, measuring, money etc.

Links to resources

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/


Speech, Language and Communication Difficulties

Websites for further information

https://www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk/

Tips

Speech sounds

- Model speech to the children by repeating words back to them correctly.

Understanding:

- Give children time to process what you have asked and respond.

- Use simple language and break instructions down into smaller steps.

- Encourage children to answer questions, such as who, what, where, when and why? When reading their books. Encourage them to tell you the story in their own words.

Expression

- Talk about all your experiences in detail, teaching new vocabulary all the time.

- Discuss vocabulary in books, making sure the children understand the meaning of tricky words.

 Social Communication

- Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.

- Use a visual timetable and visual aids to provide structure and routines. 

Links to resources

https://www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk/resources/resources/resources-for-parents/